runs until Feb 17 2019


Disappeared or Forgotten: Akonessen, Zitya, Tina, Marie and the others


Exhibition - Musée de la civilisation

- Location -

Musée de la civilisation

85, rue Dalhousie
Quebec City (Québec) G1K 8R2
T. 418 643-2158
Toll-free 1 866 710-8031

Directions

Musée de la civilisation

Musée de la civilisation

85, rue Dalhousie
Quebec City (Québec) G1K 8R2
T. 418 643-2158
Toll-free 1 866 710-8031

Directions

- Date -

runs until Feb 17 2019

- Fees -

Admission Fees

Adults (31+)$17
18 to 30 $11
12 to 17$6
11 and under$0
Families$36

MembersFree

view rates

Adults (31+)$17
18 to 30 $11
12 to 17$6
11 and under$0
Families$36

MembersFree

Nine works by aboriginal artists and craftswomen generate strong emotions in the face of the painful destinies of numerous aboriginal women and girls.

Image : Shawl of a Kukum by Diane Blacksmith, 2015. Photo by La Boîte Rouge VIF

"The image of the native woman invented during colonization has clung to the collective mind as all clichés born of ignorance do. Free women, loving women, enveloping millennia of culture in their warmth & care, all the while being perceived as simply docile and without faith or morals; they have been disembodied.

This objectified image has persisted through time and has come to an inevitable mutation: frailty. Of this historical construct, what remains is what we see today: disaster; in the collectivity as well as in the family unit. Mothers, friends, sisters, Akonessen, Zitya, Tina, Marie… disappeared or forgotten.

The weight of the word "forgotten" is universally and tremendously heavy. To be born a native woman in Canada is uncontrollable yet all this violence accompanies the simple fact of having been born here.  

The knowledge and know-how of women is a tradition, which is interwoven with gentleness as well as strength; a mixture of beauty and solace. Where many have left a void, others are still here to rekindle hope, to create a remembrance too long to cast aside. They are essential, they hold on and resist in all their infinite patience; they are the pillars of succeeding generations in a world fast attaining its own limitations. They are strong and they succeed in giving us space to breathe during this transition between turmoil and resolution."

– Marie-Andrée Gill, ilnu autor